1. Department of Educational Administration
Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education (HALE) Program
Cordially Invites You To A Research Presentation
Privatization in Cross-Border Engagements: The Sometimes Public Nature of Private Activity
By Jason E. Lane, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Educational Administration and Policy Studies
Research Fellow, Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government
University at Albany, State University of New York

Thursday, December 9, 2010
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Rm. 252 Erickson Hall

This presentation explores the sometimes public nature of cross-border educational activities. Educational institutions crossing-borders, whether it be through joint ventures or international branch campuses, has traditionally been viewed as an extension of privatization. However, such activities have only been analyzed from the perspective of the exporting country, not the importing country. Using an adaptation of Bruce Johnstone’s framework on privatization, this study analyzes the role of cross-border activities in Qatar in the Malaysian state of Sarawak. The study concludes that activities deemed to be of a private nature from the perspective of exporting country can fulfill traditionally public policy goals in the importing country.
Dr. Lane is a candidate for a position in the Department of Educational Administration


2. If you haven't already, register now for Spring 2011, as low enrollments can lead to canceled classes. Two that may interest you:
861: Adult Learning in Spring 2010
This graduate-level course is intended to help you develop a better understanding of learning in adulthood. In this course, you will learn about:
Who and what are adult learners
How adult learners are different from child, youth, and emerging adult learners
How age-related differences, learning styles, and cultural backgrounds influence adult learning
What motivates adults to participate and persist in educational programs
How adults learn from and through experience
What makes adult learning transformative
What role the social context plays in shaping and influencing adult learning
Using a problem-based approach, we will explore the implications of the research and theory on these questions for planning, implementing and assessing educational programs for adult learners.
This course is designed to help you be more effective in your interactions and relationships with adult learners in postsecondary education, including community colleges, higher education, staff and professional development, faculty development, continuing education, and other adult education settings.

EAD 866 Teaching in Postsecondary Education,
is a graduate level course intended to support participants in becoming more effective and reflective educators. ! This course helps participants:

• Understand different ways of thinking about teaching
• Identify how the nature of the learner, the learning process and learning environments shape and influence the practice of teaching
• Design and plan learning experiences for students that foster active, involved, and engaged learning
• Plan and use active lecturing strategies
• Facilitate small group learning activities
• Use experiential learning approaches
• Integrate technology into the process of helping students learn
• Effectively assess student learning
• Improve teaching through assessment and teacher learning and development

The course focuses on a variety of educational contexts in which educators help adults and emerging adults learn, including college classrooms, clinical instruction, staff and faculty development, continuing professional education, the workplace and community-based settings.


3.The Center for Gender in Global Context invites MSU graduate students to submit a paper for its annual competition, named for Rita S. Gallin in honor of her 13 years as director of the Women and International Development Program and her scholarship in the area of women, gender, international development, and globalization. The paper should be approximately 20 double-spaced pages in length, and have been completed within the past year and should focus on issues related to women, gender, international development, and globalization.

The Center for Gender in Global Context invites MSU undergraduate students to submit a paper for its annual competition, named to honor former women's rights activist and MSU Women's Studies scholar Mary Anderson, who lost her battle with breast cancer in 1993. The paper should have been completed within the past year and should focus on issues related to women and gender in global perspective. Papers should be approximately 20 double-spaced pages in length.

Papers will be reviewed by a faculty committee, and the award will be presented at the annual GenCen Open House in January. The winning paper may be peer reviewed for publication in the GPID Working Paper Series or on the GenCen website. Authors will receive a $200.00 prize.
Submissions are to be made to the GenCen office via email at gencen@msu.edu (in Microsoft Word) or by mail (both hard copy and on diskette/CD/DVD in Microsoft Word). Please indicate that you are submitting to the competition and be sure to include a contact phone number and email address.
A list of previous winners can be found on the GenCen website at www.gencen.msu.edu/resources/papercompetition.htm


5. Next year's scholarship application!
Important Information for EAD Students about the Application Process for Scholarships

PLEASE ASK FACULTY Members FOR RECOMMENDATIONS BY Monday, Dec. 13, 2010. Specify those awards for which you will be applying and indicate if the faculty member is being asked to submit the electronic recommendation or to write a supplemental letter of recommendation.

Deadline to Apply to College and Department: Friday, January 14, 2011, 5:00 P.M.

We encourage all EAD students to consider carefully the various scholarships and fellowships available to current students. College guidelines about scholarships as well as application instructions are available at the following sites:
To review the different criteria for each scholarship, see Web site:
http://education.msu.edu/resources/financial/grad-scholarships.asp
The on-line application site is located at:
https://www.educ.msu.edu/gradScholar/

Attached is the complete list of scholarships.
[[file/view/CollegeEAD_Awards_Application_Process_2011-12.docx|CollegeEAD_Awards_Application_Process_2011-12.docx]]

6. Summer Fellowship Proposals from the office of Michael Sedlak

The College of Education announces three Summer research funding opportunities for US11. We are continuing our regular Summer Research Fellowships (SRF11), and our recently-established Summer Research Development Fellowships (SRDF11) for first-year PhD students. We are also adding new two-year Summer Research Renewable Fellowships (SRRF11-12). Details and application procedures follow.

General Terms and Procedures

The awards will consist of a fellowship for $6000 (SRF and SRRF) or $5000 (SRDF), which will be paid in April, 2011. The fellowships are designed to support students full-time, so recipients may not enroll in any courses, nor hold any other work assignments during the summer semester. Recipients of University Fellowship awards who are in their initial fellowship year, are not eligible to receive one of these awards (MSU Fellowship recipients are already full-funded during the summer following their first year, and are required to enroll in at least one course).

The programs will also provide $500 to the faculty mentor who agrees to oversee a student's project. At the end of summer, by approximately August 15, 2011, recipients will be expected to submit an email to me that summarizes their accomplishments. Because the fellowship will be paid in April, recipients must be enrolled during the spring semester.

Applications for all three fellowships should be structured similarly (although the content will differ considerably). Each complete proposal will include:

1. A three-page (single-spaced) proposal that outlines the goals of the project. References and essential brief supplementary matter can exceed the three page limit. Please list your faculty mentor's name on the line following your own name and PID at the beginning of the proposal. The final page of the proposal (following references) should include an additional sheet consisting of the applicant's MSU PhD transcript. Here is how you secure and insert your MSU transcript (submit only your PhD coursework):

1) go to stuinfo.msu.edu and login
2) select Courses By Term
3) under File tab choose Select All
4) copy and paste to the Word document

2. An email statement to me from prospective faculty mentors agreeing to oversee the project, if funded. This is not a letter of recommendation; just a sentence agreeing to mentor the project.

Proposals are to be submitted electronically as Word attachments (see filenaming rules under each award below) to the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (edacadaf@msu.edu). Make certain that your full name and PID appear at the start of the proposal; no separate title pages; everything must be in Verdana 10 point font; must have page numbers in the footer.

The email to which the proposal is attached should include the following in the Subject Line:

[Name of the relevant fellowship Application, for example

Subject: SRDF11Application, or SRRF11-12Application

We must receive these proposals no later than 11am Monday, January 10, 2011.

Request for Proposals for 2011 Summer Research Fellowships

The award is designed to intensify and accelerate the scholarly development of our students. Doctoral students in the college who are not yet at the dissertation stage are eligible to apply.

The summer fellowship may be used to collect data, to analyze and write-up previously collected research data, to complete an ongoing project, or to move it to the publication stage. The proposal should indicate where the research will be presented or published.

The fellowships are intended to support students' original work, or, possibly, a piece of a larger project which is assigned exclusively to the student. It is not intended to support graduate research assistantship assignments. Selection will be based on the quality of the proposal, progress that is expected be made on the project during the summer fellowship period, and the student's academic record, with preference given to students in the early stage of their program (typically to those just finishing their second year, or possibly third year).

Name the file in this fashion exactly (no spaces): SRF11PropYourLastName.doc (for example: SRF11PropSmith.doc)


Request for Proposals for 2011 Summer Research Renewable Fellowships

This is a new award that will support recipients for two consecutive summers (US11 and US12), conditional upon satisfactory completion of the first summer's assignment. The application should present a scope of work that spans at least the two summers; it should discuss the anticipated nature of progress to be attained by the end of the first summer, and should specify likely deliverables and products (conference presentations, publication proposals) that would be ready at the end of the second summer.

The award is designed to intensify and accelerate the scholarly development of our students. Doctoral students in the college who are not yet at the dissertation stage are eligible to apply.

The summer fellowship may be used to collect data, to analyze and write-up previously collected research data, to complete an ongoing project, or to move it to the publication stage. The proposal should indicate where the research will be presented or published.

The fellowships are intended to support students' original work, or, possibly, a piece of a larger project which is assigned exclusively to the student. It is not intended to support graduate research assistantship assignments. Selection will be based on the quality of the proposal, progress that is expected be made on the project during the summer fellowship period, and the student's academic record, with preference given to students in the early stage of their program (typically to those just finishing their first, second, or possibly third year).

Name the file in this fashion exactly (no spaces): SRRF11-12PropYourLastName.doc (for example: SRRF11-12PropSmith.doc)


Request for Proposals for 2011 Summer Research Development Fellowships

These awards are targeted at very early stage PhD students only; to be eligible, applicants cannot have completed -- by the end of the spring, 2011 semester -- anything beyond their first year (if a full-time residential student), or 18 credits if a non-residential or part-time student.

Unlike the regular Summer Research Fellowships, which support students who are actually pretty far along in a research project, these awards are reserved for those who are in an earlier stage of developing research skills and approaches, those needing to make progress on developing an appropriate researchable question, identifying or customizing methods to pursue a good question, preparing an effective literature review; perhaps collecting initial data, or a combination of these. They are not designed to support the completion of projects and publication, as would be the case with the regular Summer Research Fellowships. Under the eligibility requirements for our two awards, no student could be eligible for both awards: if you are far enough along to compete for the SRF, you are by definition too far along to compete for the SRDF.

Applications should be submitted by individuals, or pairs, or even a trio of students (no more than three), and associated faculty members (again, one or possibly two) if working with a group of three students who would work collaboratively in this sort of research development tutorial.

Recipients would devote full time to this tutorial; no employment whatsoever, or regular course taking is permitted, although, a student could enroll in an independent study that focused on this work.

The teams (minimum one student and one faculty; maximum of three students) should submit a plan of work, no longer than three single-spaced pages, a presentation of the scope of work that details the research skills to be developed and how they will be strengthened, and a statement about prior research skill development on the part of each of the student members. A copy of each student's transcripts is also needed for all participants. The plan should lead off with the names of the students and the names of the faculty who are pledging to oversee the work plan.

The plans must be submitted as email attachments from a lead student in the tutorial.

Name the file in this fashion exactly (no spaces): SRDF11PlanYourLastName.doc (for example: SRDF11PlanSmith.doc)

and finally..... OISS International Coffee Hour
Please join OISS every Friday from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm* for the International Coffee Hour. It takes place in the International Center (Spartan Room B & C) and is a great place to make friends, be involved and start the weekend… and the coffee is free!
( Coffee hour only takes place during the Fall and Spring semesters when classes are in session.)
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